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Fisheries of the United States: 2011 Review

26 November 2012

This publication by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a preliminary report for 2011 on commercial fisheries and a final report for recreational fisheries of the United States with landings from the US territorial seas, the US Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), and on the high seas.

U.S. Landings

Commercial landings (edible and industrial) by U.S. fishermen at ports in the 50 states were 10.1 billion pounds or 4.6 million metric tons valued at $5.3 billion in 2011—an increase of 1.86 billion pounds (up 22.6 percent) and of $784 million (up 17.4 percent) compared with 2010. Finfish accounted for 87 percent of the total landings, but only 49 percent of the value. The 2011 average exvessel price paid to fishermen was 53 cents compared to 55 cents in 2010.

Catches of Alaska pollock, Pacific whiting and other Pacific groundfish that are processed at-sea aboard U.S. vessels in the northeastern Pacific are credited as “landings” to the state nearest to the area of capture. Information on landing port or percentage of catch transferred to transport ships for delivery to foreign ports is unavailable. These at-sea processed fishery products, on a round (live) weight basis, exceeded 1.3 million metric tons in 2011 and comprised 28 percent of the total domestic landings in the 50 states.

Commercial landings by U.S. fishermen at ports outside the 50 states along with Internal Water Processing (IWP) agreements (see glossary) provided an additional 450.8 million pounds (204,481 metric tons) valued at $325.6 million. This was a decrease of 6 percent, or 32.1 million pounds (14,560 metric tons) in quantity and an increase of $51.3 million (19 percent) in value compared with 2010. Most of these landings consisted of tuna landed in American Samoa and other foreign ports.

Edible fish and shellfish landings in the 50 states were 7.9 billion pounds (3.6 million metric tons) in 2011—an increase of 1.38 billion pounds (625,963 metric tons) compared with 2010.

Landings for reduction and other industrial purposes were 2.2 billion pounds (997,913 metric tons) in 2011—an increase of 28 percent compared with 2010.

The 2011 U.S. marine recreational finfish catch (including fish kept and fish released (discarded) on the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts including Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico) was an estimated 345 million fish taken on an estimated 69 million fishing trips. The harvest (fish kept or released dead) was estimated at 140 million fish weighing over 201 million pounds.

World Landings

In 2010, the most recent year for which global data are available, world commercial fishery landings and aquaculture production were 148.5 million metric tons—an increase of 3.1 million metric tons compared with 2009. Aquaculture production increased by 4.2 million metric tons while fishery landings decreased by 1.0 million tons.

China was the leading nation in both fishery landings and aquaculture production accounting for 35 percent of the total harvest. India is the second leading producer with 6 percent. Indonesia was the third with just over 5 percent. Viet Nam, The United States, and Japan follow with 3 percent of the global harvest.

Prices

The 2011 annual exvessel price index for edible fish remained the same, shellfish increased by 4 percent and industrial product remained constant compared with 2010. Exvessel price indices increased for 21 out of 33 species groups being tracked, decreased for 10 species groups, and was unchanged for two species groups. The snow crabs price index had the largest increase (90 percent) while the hard clams price index showed the largest decrease (72 percent).

Processed Products

The estimated value of the 2011 domestic production of edible and nonedible fishery products was $9.6 billion, $406.6 million more than in 2010. The value of edible products was $8.9 billion—an increase of $247.5 million compared with 2010. The value of industrial products was $672.8 million in 2011—an increase of $159 million compared with 2010.

Foreign Trade

The total import value of edible and nonedible fishery products was $30.8 billion in 2011—an increase of $3.4 billion compared with 2010. Imports of edible fishery products (product weight) were 5.3 billion pounds valued at $16.6 billion in 2011—a decrease of 123.6 million pounds and an increase of $1.8 billion compared with 2010. Imports of nonedible (i.e., industrial) products were $14.2 billion—an increase of $1.6 billion compared with 2010.

Total export value of edible and nonedible fishery products was $26.0 billion in 2011—an increase of $3.7 billion compared with 2010. United States firms exported 3.3 billion pounds of edible products valued at $5.4 billion—an increase of 530.4 million pounds and an increase of $1.0 billion compared with 2010. Exports of nonedible products were valued at $20.6 billion, $2.6 billion more than 2010.

Supply

The U.S. supply of edible fishery products (domestic landings plus imports, round weight equivalent, minus exports) was 12.1 billion pounds in 2011—a decrease of 257 million pounds compared with 2010. The supply of industrial fishery products was 1.5 billion pounds in 2011—an increase of 282 million pounds compared with 2010.

Per Capita Consumption

U.S. consumption of fishery products was 15.0 pounds of edible meat per person in 2011, down 0.8 pounds from the 2010 per capita consumption of 15.8 pounds. A large increase in fishery landings was more than offset by a large increase in exports and a decrease in farmed catfish production.

Consumer Expenditures

U.S. consumers spent an estimated $85.9 billion for fishery products in 2011. The 2011 total includes $57.7 billion in expenditures at food service establishments (restaurants, carry-outs, caterers, etc.); $27.6 billion in retail sales for home consumption; and $625 million for industrial fish products. By producing and marketing a variety of fishery products for domestic and foreign markets, the commercial marine fishing industry contributed $43.9 billion (in value added) to the U.S. Gross National Product.

Alaska led all states in volume with landings of 5.4 billion pounds; followed by Louisiana, 1.5 billion pounds; Virginia, 493.4 million pounds; Washington, 487.8 million pounds; and California, 415.6 million pounds.

Alaska led all states in value of landings with $1.9 billion; followed by Massachusetts, $570.7 million; Maine, $426.5 million; Louisiana, $339.3 million; and Washington $319.8 million.

Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, Alaska, was the leading U.S. port in quantity of commercial fishery landings, followed by: Empire-Venice, Louisiana; Akutan, Alaska, Reedville, Virginia; and Kodiak, Alaska.

New Bedford, Massachusetts was the leading U.S. port in terms of value, followed by: Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, Alaska; Kodiak, Alaska; Akutan, Alaska; and Cape May-Wildwood, New Jersey.

Tuna landings by U.S.-flag vessels at ports outside the continental United States amounted to 450.8 million pounds.

Major U.S. Domestic Species Landed in 2011
Ranked by Volume and Value

Note: Flatfish excludes Halibut

Alaska Pollock and Other Pacific Trawl Fish

U.S. landings of Pacific trawl fish (Pacific cod, flounders, hake, Pacific ocean perch, Alaska pollock, and rockfishes) were nearly 4.8 billion pounds valued at nearly $753.9 million in 2011—an increase of over 34 percent in quantity and an increase of over 30 percent in value compared with 2010.

Landings of Alaska pollock (2.8 billion) increased from 2010 and were over 299.3 million pounds over their 2006 - 2010 5 - year average. Landings of Pacific cod were almost 664.3 million pounds — an increase of 23 percent from 539.6 million in 2010. Pacific hake (whiting) landings were more than 496.4 million pounds (up almost 40 percent) valued at almost $52.6 million (up almost 93 percent) compared to 2010. Landings of rockfishes were 35.3 million pounds (down nearly 11 percent) and valued at $16.1 million (down over 10 percent) compared to 2010.

Anchovies

U.S. landings of anchovies were 6.2 million pounds—an increase of nearly 3.4 million pounds (over 120 percent) compared with 2010. One percent of all landings were used for animal food or reduction and 99 percent were used for bait. The U.S. imports all edible anchovies.

Halibut

U.S. landings of Atlantic and Pacific halibut were 42.8 million pounds (round weight) valued at $213 million—a decrease of almost 13.7 million pounds (24 percent) but an increase of almost $6.5 million (3 percent) compared with 2010. The Pacific fishery accounted for all but 57,000 pounds of the 2011 total halibut catch. The average exvessel price per pound in 2011 was $4.97 compared with $3.66 in 2010.

Sea Herring

U.S. commercial landings of sea herring were over 276.3 million pounds valued at almost $37.7 million—an increase of 23 million pounds (9 percent), but a decrease of $6.9 million (more than 15 percent) compared with 2010. Landings of Atlantic sea herring were 173.8 million pounds valued at $24.8 million—an increase of almost 29.3 million pounds (over 20 percent), and $3.5 million (almost 17 percent) compared with 2010.

Landings of Pacific sea herring were over 102.5 million pounds valued at $12.9 million—a decrease of more than 6.3 million pounds (nearly 6 percent), and more than $10.4 million (almost 45 percent) compared with 2010. Alaska landings accounted for 96 percent of the Pacific coast with almost 98.6 million pounds valued at over $12.3 million—a decrease of 9.5 million pounds (nearly 9 percent), and almost $10.7 million (almost 47 percent) compared with 2010.

Jack Mackerel

California accounted for almost 73 percent, Oregon for over 10 percent, and Washington nearly 17 percent of the U.S. landings of jack mackerel in 2011. Total landings were 243,000 pounds valued at $21,000—a decrease of 441,000 pounds (almost 65 percent), and $42,000 (almost 67 percent) compared with 2010. The 2011 average exvessel price per pound was 9 cents.

Mackerel, Atlantic

U.S. landings of Atlantic mackerel were more than 1.1 million pounds valued at $397,000—a decrease of almost 20.6 million pounds (almost 95 percent), and $4 million (91 percent) compared with 2010. Massachusetts with 521,000 pounds and New Jersey with 107,000 pounds accounted for nearly 55 percent of the total landings. The average exvessel price per pound in 2011 was 34 cents compared with 20 cents in 2010.

Mackerel, Chub

Landings of chub mackerel were 3 million pounds valued at $330,000—a decrease of 1.7 million pounds (almost 37 percent), and $117,000 (26 percent) compared with 2010. California accounted for 100 percent of the total landings. The average exvessel price in 2011 was 11 cents compared with 9 cents in 2010.

Menhaden

The U.S. menhaden landings were 2.1 billion pounds valued at $150.2 million—an increase of 633.1 million pounds (43 percent), and $43 million (40 percent) compared with 2010. Landings decreased by over 4 million pounds (nearly 1 percent) in the Atlantic states, while increasing by 637.2 million pounds (nearly 66 percent) in the Gulf states compared with 2010. Landings along the Atlantic coast were nearly 500.8 million pounds valued at $40.1 million. Gulf region landings were almost 1.6 billion pounds valued at $110 million.

Menhaden are used primarily for the production of meal, oil, and solubles, while small quantities are used for bait.

North Atlantic Trawl Fish

Landings of butterfish, Atlantic cod, cusk, flounders (winter/blackback, summer/fluke, yellowtail and other), haddock, red and white hake, ocean perch, pollock and whiting (silver hake) in the North Atlantic (combination of New England, Middle Atlantic, and Chesapeake Regions) were almost 103.7 million pounds valued at almost $129.6 million—an increase of nearly 4.1 million pounds (4 percent), and over $11.3 million (almost 10 percent) compared with 2010. Of these species, flounders led in total value in the North Atlantic, accounting for 36 percent of the total; followed by cod, 25 percent; and haddock, almost 13 percent.

The 2011 landings of Atlantic cod were 17.6 million pounds valued at $32.6 million—a decrease of 112,000 pounds (almost 1 percent), but an increase of nearly $4.5 million (16 percent) compared with 2010. The exvessel price per pound in 2011 was $1.85 compared with $1.59 in 2010.

Landings of yellowtail flounder were more than 4 million—an increase of over 1.1 million pounds (nearly 39%) from 2010 and were more than 10 percent higher than the 5-year average.

Haddock landings decreased to almost 12.6 million pounds (down nearly 42 percent) and over $16.3 million (down nearly 25 percent) compared to 2010.

North Atlantic pollock landings were nearly 15.9 million pounds valued at over $12.3 million—an increase of 4.5 million pounds (40 percent), and nearly $2.8 million (more than 29 percent) compared with 2010.

Pacific Salmon

U.S. commercial landings of salmon were 780.1 million pounds valued at over $618.3 million—a decrease of almost 7.7 million pounds (1 percent), but an increase of $63.5 million (more than 11 percent) compared with 2010. Alaska accounted for almost 95 percent of total landings; Washington, nearly 5 percent; California, Oregon, and the Great Lakes accounted for less than 1 percent of the catch. Sockeye salmon landings were 249.5 million pounds valued at almost $298.6 million—a decrease of almost 3.5 million pounds (more than 1 percent), but an increase of $19.9 million (7 percent) compared with 2010. Chinook salmon landings increased to nearly 14.8 million pounds-up 1.4 million pounds (almost 11 percent) from 2010. Pink salmon landings were nearly 388.4 million pounds-an increase of 15.8 million (over 4 percent); chum salmon landings were 102.5 million pounds, a decrease of 13.1 million (over 11 percent); and coho salmon decreased to nearly 24.9 million—a decrease of almost 8.4 million (25 percent) compared with 2010.

Alaska landings were 738.1 million pounds valued at nearly $564.8 million—a decrease of almost 18.7 million pounds (more than 2 percent), but an increase of $59.1 million (almost 12 percent) compared with 2010. The distribution of Alaska salmon landings by species in 2011 was: pink, more than 369.4 million pounds (50 percent); sockeye, 247.8 million pounds (almost 34 percent); chum, nearly 94.1 million pounds (almost 13 percent); coho, almost 20.7 million pounds (nearly 3 percent); and chinook, more than 6.1 million pounds (nearly 1 percent). The average price per pound for all species in Alaska was 77 cents in 2011-an increase of 10 cents from 2010.

Washington salmon landings were over 38.3 million pounds valued at $41.6 million—an increase of almost 10.6 million pounds (38 percent) and $1.5 million (nearly 4 percent) compared with 2010. The biennial fishery for pink salmon went from 12,000 in 2010 to nearly 18.9 million pounds in 2011. Washington landings of chum salmon were more than 8.4 million (up almost 12 percent); followed by chinook, 5.4 million pounds (up almost 2 percent); coho, 3.8 million pounds (up more than 5 percent); and sockeye, 1.7 million pounds (down almost 85 percent). The average exvessel price per pound for all species in Washington decreased from $1.45 in 2010 to $1.09 in 2011.

Oregon salmon landings were almost 2.4 million pounds valued at $6.7 million—a decrease of 366,000 pounds (more than 13 percent) and $957,000 (more than 12 percent) compared with 2010. Chinook salmon landings were 1.9 million pounds valued at $6 million; coho landings were 461,000 pounds valued at $759,000; sockeye landings were 3,000 pounds valued at $6,000; pink landings were 1,000 pounds valued at less than $500; and chum landings were less than 500 pounds valued at less than $500. The average exvessel price per pound for chinook salmon in Oregon decreased from $3.18 in 2010 to $3.12 in 2011.

California salmon landings were over 1.1 million pounds valued at nearly $5.1 million. Chinook salmon were the principal species landed in the state. The average exvessel price per pound paid to fishermen in 2011 was $4.49 compared with $4.72 in 2010.

Sablefish

U.S. commercial landings of sablefish were 41.2 million pounds valued at nearly $183.9 million—an increase of 884,000 pounds (2 percent) and $59.5 million (nearly 48 percent) compared with 2010. Landings increased in Alaska to 27.1 million pounds-an increase of more than 7 percent compared with 2010. Landings increased in Washington to 3.4 million pounds (up over 4 percent) and more than $12.4 million (up 32 percent). The 2011 Oregon catch was almost 5.1 million pounds (down nearly 19 percent), but value increased to more than $17.4 million (up more than 15 percent) compared with 2010. California landings of 5.5 million pounds and nearly $14.8 million represent an increase of nearly 1 percent in quantity and nearly 29 percent in value from 2010. The average exvessel price per pound in 2011 was $4.46 compared with $3.09 in 2010.

Tuna

Landings of tuna by U.S. fishermen at ports in United States, American Samoa, other U.S. territories, and foreign ports were 501.9 million pounds valued at more than $470.4 million—a decrease of 29 million pounds (more than 5 percent), but an increase of almost $87.6 million (nearly 23 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound of all species of tuna in 2011 was 94 cents compared with 72 cents in 2010.

Bigeye landings in 2011 were over 20.2 million pounds-a decrease of almost 2.7 million pounds (almost 12 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound was $3.08 in 2011, compared to $2.57 in 2010.

Skipjack landings were 393.7 million pounds-a decrease of 30.1 million pounds (7 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound was 72 cents in 2011, compared to 57 cents in 2010.

Yellowfin landings were more than 56.4 million pounds-an increase of nearly 1.8 million pounds (over 3 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound was 98 cents in 2011, compared with 76 cents in 2010.

Bluefin landings were nearly 2.8 million pounds-an increase of almost 1.4 million pounds (99 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound in 2011 was $6.90 compared with $6.94 in 2010.

Clams

Landings of all species yielded almost 86.5 million pounds of meats valued at over $186.6 million—a decrease of more than 2.4 million pounds (almost 3 percent) and $14 million (7 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound in 2011 was $2.16 compared with $2.26 in 2010.

Surf clams yielded 42 million pounds of meats valued at $28.8 million—an increase of over 1.2 million pounds (3 percent) and $732,000 (almost 3 percent) compared with 2010. New Jersey was the leading state with nearly 16.9 million pounds (down almost 33 percent compared with 2010), followed by Maine, over 12.2 million pounds; and Massachusetts, 8.8 million pounds (up over 8 percent). The average exvessel price per pound of meats was 69 cents in 2011, unchanged from 2010.

The ocean quahog fishery produced nearly 31.8 million pounds of meats valued at $22.1 million—a decrease of almost 3.6 million pounds (10 percent) and $983,000 (over 4 percent) compared with 2010. New Jersey had landings of more than 12.4 million pounds (down almost 8 percent compared with 2010) valued at more than $8.4 million (up over 7 percent) while Maine production was almost 10.6 million pounds valued at $7.5 million. Together, New Jersey and Maine accounted for almost 73 percent of total ocean quahog production in 2011. The average exvessel price per pound of meats increased from 65 cents in 2010 to 70 cents in 2011.

The hard clam fishery produced almost 4.6 million pounds of meats valued at $32.4 million—an increase of 392,000 pounds (more than 9 percent), but a decrease of $8.5 million (nearly 21 percent) compared with 2010. Landings in the New England region were 1.6 million pounds of meats (down over 10 percent); Middle Atlantic, 39,000 pounds (up 56 percent); Chesapeake, 2.3 million pounds (up 47 percent); and the South Atlantic region, 558,000 pounds (down 11 percent). The average exvessel price per pound of meats decreased from $9.80 in 2010 to $7.09 in 2011.

Soft clams yielded 4.5 million pounds of meats valued at $21 million—an increase of 254,000 pounds (6 percent) and $651,000 (3 percent) compared with 2010. Maine was the leading state with more than 2.3 million pounds of meats (up almost 13 percent), followed by Massachusetts, 1.6 million pounds (up 44 percent), and Washington, 525,000 pounds (down nearly 43 percent). The average exvessel price per pound of meats was $4.67 in 2011, compared with $4.80 in 2010.

Crabs

Landings of all species of crabs were 369.2 million pounds valued at over $650.2 million—an increase of 19.5 million pounds (almost 6 percent) and more than $77.4 million (almost 14 percent) compared with 2010.

Hard blue crab landings were 197.8 million pounds valued at more than $180.4 million—an increase of 14 million pounds (almost 8 percent), but a decrease of more than $31.4 million (nearly 15 percent) compared with 2010. Maryland landed over 25 percent of the total U.S. landings followed by: Louisiana, 22 percent; Virginia, 19 percent; and North Carolina, almost 15 percent. Hard blue crab landings in the Chesapeake region were nearly 87.9 million pounds-a decrease of more than 3 percent; the South Atlantic with more than 41.4 million pounds increased over 8 percent; and the Gulf region with 55 million pounds increased more than 34 percent. The Middle Atlantic region with almost 13.6 million pounds valued at almost $12.6 million had a decrease of 154,000 pounds (1 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound of hard blue crabs was 91 cents in 2011, compared with $1.15 in 2010.

Dungeness crab landings were more than 67.4 million pounds valued at $185.5 million—an increase of 2.1 million pounds (over 3 percent) and almost $45.7 million (almost 33 percent) compared with 2010. Washington landings of 27.1 million pounds (up over 20 percent from 2010) led all states with 40 percent of the total landings. California landings were almost 19.7 million pounds (down 9 percent) or over 29 percent of the total landings. Oregon landings were over 17.2 million pounds (up 9 percent) and Alaska landings were more than 3.4 million pounds (down nearly 36 percent). The average exvessel price per pound was $2.75 in 2011, compared with $2.14 in 2010.

U.S. landings of king crab were 17 million pounds valued at almost $110.6 million—a decrease of more than 7 million pounds (over 29 percent) and $11.8 million (almost 10 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound in 2011 was $6.50 compared with $5.09 in 2010.

Snow crab landings were 54 million pounds valued at $115.5 million—an increase of 6.2 million pounds (13 percent) and nearly $61.5 million (110 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound was $2.14 in 2011, up from $1.13 in 2010.

Lobster, American

American lobster landings were over 126.3 million pounds valued at $423.5 million—an increase of nearly 10.9 million pounds (more than 9 percent) and nearly $26.8 million (almost 7 percent) compared with 2010. Maine led in landings for the 30th consecutive year with almost 104.7 million pounds valued at over $334.3 million-an increase of 10 million pounds (almost 11 percent) compared with 2010. Massachusetts, the second leading producer, had landings of almost 13.7 million pounds valued at nearly $54.9 million-an increase of 966,000 pounds (almost 8 percent) compared with 2010. Together, Maine and Massachusetts produced nearly 94 percent of the total national landings. The average exvessel price per pound was $3.35 in 2011, compared with $3.44 in 2010.

Lobster, Spiny

U.S. landings of spiny lobster were almost 6.4 million pounds valued at $50 million–a decrease of 16,000 pounds (less than 1 percent), but an increase of $4 million (almost 9 percent) compared with 2010. Florida, with landings of 5.6 million pounds valued at over $37.2 million, accounted for over 88 percent of the total catch and more than 74 percent of the value. This was a decrease of 60,000 pounds (1 percent), but an increase of nearly $2.4 million (nearly 7 percent) compared with 2010. Overall the average exvessel price per pound was $7.87 in 2011, compared with $7.22 in 2010.

Oysters

U.S. oyster landings yielded 28.5 million pounds valued at $131.7 million—an increase of 424,000 pounds (almost 2 percent) and $14.1 million (12 percent) compared with 2010. The Gulf region led in production with over 18.2 million pounds of meats, nearly 64 percent of the national total; followed by the Pacific Coast region with 7.9 million pounds (nearly 28 percent), principally Washington, with nearly 5.9 million pounds (74 percent of the region’s total volume); and the South Atlantic region with 1.2 million pounds (over 4 percent). The average exvessel price per pound of meats was $4.62 in 2011, compared with $4.19 in 2010.

Scalops

U.S. landings of bay and sea scallops totaled 59.3 million pounds valued at $587 million—an increase of nearly 1.7 million pounds (nearly 3 percent) and more than $130.4 million (almost 29 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound of meats increased from $7.93 in 2010 to $9.90 in 2011.

Bay scallop landings were 160,000 pounds valued at more than $2.1 million—an increase of 30,000 pounds (23 percent) and $594,000 (more than 38 percent) compared with 2010. The average exvessel price per pound of meats was $13.36 in 2011, compared with $11.87 in 2010.

Sea scallop landings were 59.1 million pounds valued at $584.9 million—an increase of almost 1.7 million pounds (nearly 3 percent) and $129.8 million (almost 29 percent) compared with 2010. Massachusetts and New Jersey were the leading states in landings of sea scallops with 33 million and almost 14.5 million pounds of meats, respectively, representing more than 80 percent of the national total. The average exvessel price per pound of meats in 2011 was $9.89 compared with $7.92 in 2010.

Shrimp

U.S. landings of shrimp were nearly 312.7 million pounds valued at almost $518 million—an increase of 53.6 million pounds (nearly 21 percent) and $104 million (25 percent) compared with 2010. Shrimp landings by region were: New England down 14 percent; South Atlantic down almost 2 percent; Gulf up 20 percent; and Pacific up almost 44 percent. The average exvessel price per pound of shrimp increased to $1.66 in 2011 from $1.60 in 2010. Gulf region landings were the nation’s largest with 212 million pounds and almost 68 percent of the national total. Louisiana led all Gulf states with almost 92.6 million pounds (up nearly 25 percent compared with 2010); followed by Texas, over 79.3 million pounds (up 3 percent); Alabama, 19.2 million pounds (up 91 percent); Florida West Coast, nearly 10.8 million pounds (down almost 2 percent); and Mississippi, 10.1 million pounds (up more than 140 percent). In the Pacific region, Oregon had landings of over 48.2 million pounds (up almost 54 percent compared with 2010); Washington had landings of 10.1 million pounds (up less than 1 percent); and California, over 8 million pounds (up over 78 percent).

Squid

U.S. commercial landings of squid were over 331.3 million pounds valued at almost $110.5 million—a decrease of nearly 5.9 million pounds (almost 2 percent), but an increase of over $12.6 million (13 percent) compared with 2010. California was the leading state with nearly 268 million pounds (nearly 81 of U.S. landings) and was followed by New Jersey with almost 22.6 million pounds (nearly 7 percent of the national total). The Pacific Coast region landings were nearly 268 million pounds (down more than 6 percent compared with 2010); followed by Middle Atlantic, nearly 31.8 million pounds (up 23 percent); followed by the New England region with nearly 27.9 million pounds (up nearly 29 percent); followed by the Chesapeake region with almost 1.6 million pounds (up nearly 54 percent); and the South Atlantic region with almost 1.3 million pounds (up almost 3 percent). The average exvessel price per pound for squid was 33 cents in 2011, compared with 29 cents in 2010.

November 2012

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